Pineville Settlement

One of the bunkers created through Project U.P.P., the kennel facility near Pineville was halfway complete when the bombs struck. Surviving members of the military in the area did an admirable job of trying to save as many civilians as possible, in direct contradiction to orders they received from their superiors. Unfortunately, the bunker was quickly overcrowded with almost 5,000 survivors and violence broke out as people were turned away. In the weeks that followed, the death toll from the fighting and subsequent looting wiped out half the survivors. Subsequent power struggles within the kennel reduced the population further, until it settled around 2,000.

Despite its initial struggles, Pineville can be considered a success story as far a settlements go. Pineville adopted a democratic system where all adults age eighteen and older get a vote on major issues affecting the bunker. While counting the votes sometimes gets chaotic, it has created an environment where everyone feels they have a voice. Everyone is trained in various combat techniques from an early age, as threats from all sides are a constant issue. Basic schooling in reading and math are required, and all children at the age of 13 are assigned to different vocational courses to ensure they have the type of skills the settlement needs to survive. At 16, they are given work assignments based on their vocational training.

The bunker has remained relatively isolated from the rest of the state until the last couple of years, when it has begun to trade with caravans coming out of New Orleans. Contact with outsiders not trying to kidnap, enslave, or kill them has made many of the young people curious about the growing city of New Orleans. And with an upcoming vote regarding sending representatives to New Orleans to further cement trade relations, many young people are jockeying for a spot on the assignment if the settlement votes for it.

Pineville Settlement

Post-Apocalyptic Blues JulieAnnDawson